Victoria Launches Campaign Against Toxic Cocktail


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Victoria Launches Campaign Against Toxic Cocktail

Victoria government and Cancer Council launch new Quit anti-vaping campaign to stop ‘new generation of addicts’

The Victorian government has launched a new ad campaign to crack down on vaping after alarming data showed it is the gateway to smoking.

The Victorian government has launched its largest public health campaign against vaping and nicotine addiction in a bit to curb the alarming number of youths picking up the habit. The two-prong Quit campaign, in partnership with the Cancer Council and Victoria Health, sheds light on the risks of vaping and focuses on shifting norms around casually partaking.

New Cancer Council research reveals that one in five Victorians believe e-cigarettes do not contain dangerous chemicals, despite vapes carrying more than 200 toxic ingredients. Cancer Council CEO Todd Harper hopes the initiatives will clear any confusion around the dangerous cocktail people are inhaling.

“Our lungs were designed for fresh air, not this toxic cocktail,” he said at the launch of the campaign on Monday. “We’ve seen a lot of effort going into the addiction of a new generation of people to these harmful products. If they are successful in addicting them, they are three times more likely to become smokers.”

The See Through the Haze ad campaign aims to inform young people aged 14 to 39, while a new online hub will offer resources to parents and carers of young people.

Despite their candy flavours, vapes have been found to contain 200 different dangerous chemicals including heavy metals like lead and mercury, and ingredients used in paint thinners like arsenic and benzene, which are known to cause cancer. Furthermore, the bright colours, packaging, and alluring descriptions of vapes make them appealing to young Australians, which adds to the severity of the problem.

VicHealth CEO Dr Sandro Demaio said a high number of brands do not declare that they contain nicotine or under-report the amount, which is alarming considering reports of children under ten trying the products. “A single teaspoon of the liquid found in e-cigarettes contains as much nicotine as six packets of cigarettes,” he said. “A high concentration of nicotine so when you breathe them into your lungs… it transfers into the bloodstream very quickly, which is what makes them so addictive.”

He also warned that second-hand vape exposure faces similar health consequences as vaping yourself due to the plumes, with studies yet to capture the full extent of the risks. Dr Demaio sent a clear message to those thinking of trying vapes, after data showed that more than 77,000 Australians who have never previously smoked started vaping.

“My message is very clear, stop vaping and don’t start vaping. These products are highly addictive, they’re toxic and they are a gateway to cigarettes, particularly for young people,” he said.

The Victorian government has launched an ad campaign called Quit to stop vaping and curb nicotine addiction in an attempt to prevent youths from taking up the habit. The campaign is in partnership with the Cancer Council and Victoria Health.

The campaign comes after research by the Cancer Council revealed that one in five Victorians believes e-cigarettes do not contain dangerous chemicals, despite containing over 200 toxic ingredients. E-cigarettes with candy flavors have been found to contain heavy metals like lead and mercury, and chemicals like arsenic and benzene, which are known to cause cancer. The aim of the campaign is to inform young Australians aged 14 to 39 about the risks associated with vaping and curb the use of these harmful products.

The VicHealth CEO, Dr. Sandro Demaio, warned that e-cigarettes are highly addictive and toxic. He drew attention to the fact that young people are exposed to a high concentration of nicotine when they inhale vape smoke, which can be as much as six packets of cigarettes. Dr. Demaio sent a clear message to those thinking of trying vapes: “Stop vaping and don’t start vaping. These products are highly addictive, they’re toxic and they are a gateway to cigarettes, particularly for young people,” he said.

The See Through the Haze ad campaign aims to inform young people aged 14 to 39 about the risks of vaping, while a new online hub will offer resources to parents and carers of young people. The campaign runs in Victoria and across other Australian states, and it is expected to have a positive impact in raising awareness about the dangers of vaping.


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