Jenks Public Schools Discusses Impact Of Vape Detectors At High School


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Jenks Public Schools Discusses Impact Of Vape Detectors At High School
Jenks Public Schools Discusses Impact Of Vape Detectors At High School

The vape detectors hanging from the ceilings of some high school bathrooms do not make any noise but send text and email alerts straight to school administrators.

Monday, December 11th 2023, 6:24 pm

JENKS, Okla.

Jenks Public Schools said vape detectors in some of its high school bathrooms are making a difference when it comes to drug use at school.

The district is also expecting to receive money soon from a lawsuit against one of the vape manufacturers.

The vape detectors hanging from the ceilings of some high school bathrooms do not make any noise but send text and email alerts straight to school administrators.

“They can delineate between nicotine. They can delineate between THC marijuana. We also get alerts if they are being tampered with,” Jenks High School Assistant Principal Andrew Morris said.

Morris said the detectors are part of a pilot program that started in February. He said the number of student drug offenses involving marijuana is half of what it was at this time last year.

But, he said, the district cannot rely on technology alone.

“Deploying vape detectors in some of our larger restrooms can be a little bit problematic because when you get an alert now you have a very broad net, and you could have 8-10 people that are in that restroom that now you have to make the decision of how do I address that concern?” he said.

Morris said another way to combat vaping at school is having faculty walk through the restrooms as a deterrent. A third tool is education.

“It’s been a pretty big issue. You see it a lot,” Jenks Senior Emma Hubler said.

Hubler is the president of Drug Free Youth at Jenks.

“We have a few guest speakers that come throughout the year,” she said.

She looks forward to seeing more educational programs available to students after the district receives money from the Juul settlement.

A spokesperson for the district said it is unclear how much money it will get from the settlement or when it will arrive. But Morris said 60 percent of the funds will go toward educating students about the effects of vaping, and the rest of the money will be used for technology.

Tulsa Public Schools said it also approved a settlement with Juul in March 2023, “for a gross amount of roughly $540,000 (before fees/costs). The Juul settlement proceeds did not have restrictions on their use.”

TPS said the litigation involved over 1500 school districts across the country.

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