AACPS joins lawsuit against vaping company Juul…


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aacps-joins-lawsuit-against-vaping-company-juul…

Anne Arundel County is joining ranks with more than 50 school districts across the country concerned about the rise in teenage vaping. Their target is Juul. They’ve hit the vaping giant with a major lawsuit.This lawsuit was filed more than a week ago in federal court in northern California. Lawyers said the goal is to hold the company accountable for driving up the use of vaping.It’s a product that had already become popular among teenagers long before the COVID-19 pandemic. A recent survey by the Food and Drug Administration estimates that more than 5 million teens were using E-Cigarettes. Phil Federico, the lawyer representing Anne Arundel County, said the Juul device specifically targets kids.”When the Juul device was created, it was designed and marketed to teenagers to the demographic under 18,” Federico said. “The Juul device looks like a thumb drive they marketed in flavors that would be attractive to younger people, cotton candy and bubble gum and the like. Consequently, what happened was kids started using this like crazy. It’s being used in middle school and high school.”Annapolis High School student, Arlin Jimenez, is among those who support the district taking legal action.”I’ve seen little kids as well do it too and I say, ‘Where are their parents’ and stuff like that,” Jimenez said. When asked about the school district’s lawsuit, Jimenez said: “They should have done that a long time ago, in my opinion, but nothing surprises me.”The lawsuit does not mention how much money the school districts are seeking. Meantime, lawyers said they have plenty of evidence that vaping is dangerous. The issue hits home for Crystal Baker, a mother of four.”I do have an older son who is actually doing the vaping. I tried to tell him, I constantly tell him it’s not a good idea due to the chemicals that are inside of it,” Baker said.Lawyers said they want to end the use of Juul before more children become hooked.Prince George’s County could be the next school district to join the lawsuit. Meanwhile, 11 News reached out to Juul, but have not received a response.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. —

Anne Arundel County is joining ranks with more than 50 school districts across the country concerned about the rise in teenage vaping. Their target is Juul. They’ve hit the vaping giant with a major lawsuit.

This lawsuit was filed more than a week ago in federal court in northern California. Lawyers said the goal is to hold the company accountable for driving up the use of vaping.

It’s a product that had already become popular among teenagers long before the COVID-19 pandemic. A recent survey by the Food and Drug Administration estimates that more than 5 million teens were using E-Cigarettes.

Phil Federico, the lawyer representing Anne Arundel County, said the Juul device specifically targets kids.

“When the Juul device was created, it was designed and marketed to teenagers to the demographic under 18,” Federico said. “The Juul device looks like a thumb drive they marketed in flavors that would be attractive to younger people, cotton candy and bubble gum and the like. Consequently, what happened was kids started using this like crazy. It’s being used in middle school and high school.”

Annapolis High School student, Arlin Jimenez, is among those who support the district taking legal action.

“I’ve seen little kids as well do it too and I say, ‘Where are their parents’ and stuff like that,” Jimenez said.

When asked about the school district’s lawsuit, Jimenez said: “They should have done that a long time ago, in my opinion, but nothing surprises me.”

The lawsuit does not mention how much money the school districts are seeking. Meantime, lawyers said they have plenty of evidence that vaping is dangerous. The issue hits home for Crystal Baker, a mother of four.

“I do have an older son who is actually doing the vaping. I tried to tell him, I constantly tell him it’s not a good idea due to the chemicals that are inside of it,” Baker said.

Lawyers said they want to end the use of Juul before more children become hooked.

Prince George’s County could be the next school district to join the lawsuit. Meanwhile, 11 News reached out to Juul, but have not received a response.


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